8 Principles of Enterprise Performance Management

This is a list of what most of my clients tell me they want.  I propose that this list is exactly what EPM delivers.

So unless I hear otherwise, these are the 8 principles of enterprise performance management:

  1. We have a lot of data, we’re getting more every minute, and we want to use it to compete better;8 robots
  2. To use all that data, we want to gather it and transform it so that it makes sense;
  3. We want new insights into our business, based on the facts gleaned from the data;
  4. We want to know what levels of performance are possible in our industry, for our business, in the future; Read more of this post
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CFO and CIO join forces to serve “The Business”

Organizations that have implemented Performance Management more broadly are nearly four times more likely to be among the most competitive organizations in their industry.

—Brian McDonough, Research Manager, Analytics and Data Warehousing Software, IDC, Financial Performance and Strategy Management Survey of Buyer Priorities for 2011, Doc #226261, Dec. 2010

Harvard Business Review advocates that business and IT shouldn’t just be aligned, they should be ‘‘forged together.’’  (David M. Upton and Bradley R. Staats, ‘‘Radically Simple IT,’’ Harvard Business Review, March 2008.)  One way HBR says you can do this is by having the CIO report directly to the CEO or COO, not the CFO. While I have seen this reporting structure in many of our client organizations, it does not automatically mean that IT and the business are forged together, or even aligned for that matter. Certainly the business analyst (BA) role has done much for crossing the chasm, in both directions, for IT and the business. And where I see the most successful financial systems implementations are where there the finance/information systems (IS) role acts as the BA. But this is still not a guarantee for a meeting of the minds between business and IT.

2 way arrows

Photo © Ruth Dimon, 2013

I propose five ‘‘better’’ practices for closer IT/business alignment based on my client engagements over the last 30 years: Read more of this post

Closing the Strategy-Execution gap

In March 2010, Harvard Business Review surveyed

Photo © Ruth Dimon, 2013

Photo © Ruth Dimon, 2013

1,075 readers about strategy and execution in their organizations.
Only 37% said their companies are ‘‘very good’’ or ‘‘excellent’’ at execution.

What is it that keeps us from having a sustainable process for executing our strategy?
On the one hand you have your strategic objectives, including:

  • Profitable Revenue Growth
  • Customer Success
  • Operational Efficiency
  • Employee Engagement
  • Cash cycle velocity
  • And so on.

On the other hand you have available resources at your disposal:

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